Showing posts with label Vocabulary. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vocabulary. Show all posts

3 Inexpensive, Quick Tips for Teaching Old and New


Thanksgiving is a great time for teaching the concepts old and new! You can have fun doing this using felt, which is inexpensive, quick to prepare and can be used from year to year. Best of all, it lets you reinforce short-lived classroom vocabulary while teaching concepts that can be used over and over again.

3 inexpensive quick tips for fun movement activities in speech/language therapy for Thanksgiving and year round!
Felt boards are one of my favorite kinds of activities for young students since they learn best when manipulating objects and moving around. And it is inexpensive and quick to set up! You don’t even need to buy an expensive felt board to use felt activities. Just go to your local fabric store and buy a large piece of felt in your favorite color.

1. Get Your Felt Board Ready

- If you have a corkboard on your wall, tack it there.

- If you don’t, get a dowel or yardstick at any craft or hardware store. Roll the edge of the felt piece over it and glue the ends together. Make sure that the ends of the dowel stick out far enough past the edges of the felt that you can tie the ends of a cord on each side. Yarn and string will also work.

- Attach it to your wall with a nail, to a magnetic board using a strong magnetic clip that can grip the cord, to the hooks that are above the old fashioned blackboards, over a doorknob…..

It is easy to make and hang your own felt board!
You get the idea- you can make it work! But, since this is Looks Like Language, here is a photo of a really funny wall hanging that my daughter-in-law gave to me. See that the dowel goes through the seam and has a cord tied on? Presto- instant wall hanging!

2. Make your felt sets.

While felt sets for sale are adorable, don’t despair if you can’t afford them! And you don’t have to painstakingly cut out pieces of felt, either.

Just take any unlaminated pictures you want to use and glue them to pieces of felt with regular school glue. Spread it thin, let it dry and you have an instant felt set!

3. Fun activities with movement built in!

Thanksgiving is a perfect time for teaching concepts in speech therapy!
1)  Have the students label the pictures they want to place on the felt board. Use additional pictures, like the old and new houses in the photo, and you have a sorting task for old and new.

2) Put all of the felt pictures on the board. Ask a question and let a student go find the answer.

3)  Give some clues about one of the pictures and see if the student can find which one you are talking about- an instant activity for building inference skills!

4)  Glue the pictures onto square pieces of felt, make duplicates, and you have a movement memory game.

Thanksgiving themed fun with felt in speech/language therapy.
      5)  Turn one set of pictures over so that the photo doesn’t show. Let your students take turns throwing a beanbag at the felt wall so that a picture falls down. If they use their target skill correctly, they get to keep the picture. When all of the pictures have fallen, the student with the most collected is the winner.  

       6)  Bring the same old and new pictures back in the winter to review. Use a soft fabric snowball for the same activity and you have indoor snowball play!

7)   Make your life even easier and check out these great Thanksgiving activities at varying levels!

Happy Thanksgiving!


Helpful Ways for Dealing with Sensory Problems You'll Like

When a member of the family has sensory processing problems and sensitivity to noises, outings like fireworks can be tough. While commonly found in children with autism spectrum disorders, other kids may have this problem, too. Here are some helpful ways to deal with this type of sensory problem.


If your child covers their ears when a fire alarm goes off, or a loud vehicle drives by, going to see fireworks may not be the happy event you were hoping for.


July free download from Looks Like Language
There's a new social rules story, quick to print, staple and read, that I've made to help you out. Just click here.

No guarantee that this will make your fireworks event problem free, but knowing what to expect, having a coping method ready, and having the language to discuss any issues that arise are strategies that help over time.


If you are intrigued by the craft and games that are not part of this free download, be sure to sign up for my special 2019 free growing games bundle offer here!





July free download from Looks Like Language
Having back up plans as parents can be helpful, too. Some ideas that could be helpful include:

* watching your child with sensory issues for the beginning signs of sensory overload. Intervening early is often more successful than waiting for full-blown overload.


* having a signal your child can give you to tell you that they have had enough.


* getting seating that is toward the back of the crowd. This may not only somewhat decrease the noise level from the fireworks, but can also reduce the overcrowdedness that can also be a problem for some children.


* having a larger blanket than you need so that your child has a place to sit with boundaries that keep crowds further away.


* coming with 2 cars so one parent can leave earlier if needed, or having a plan for one parent to remove the sensory child before overload occurs to the car. Have calming toys, blankets, headphones, or whatever works for your child to use during the wait.


If your child regularly has problems with sensory processing issues, get an appointment for an evaluation with an occupational therapist who is knowledgeable about the problem. That is where most of my knowledge comes from!



I also found this book to be extremely helpful when I read it many years ago. It is written in a way that is helpful to parents and educators.

I hope that some of these ideas help to make your 4th of July fun and calm!


5 NO COST Tips to Help STOP Summer Time Lag!


Did you know that students who don’t keep expanding their vocabulary over the summer come back to school in the fall lagging behind their peers who continued learning?

5 No Cost ways to stop summertime lag by Looks Like Language
It is just one way to measure growth, but is closely tied to many skills needed for school success.

Parents, what you do with your children at home is so important! You CAN help your kids to be better prepared for school each and every year. These ideas are NO COST, but they do take a bit of time. And you don't even need to leave your home for most of these!

5 tips to help stop that summertime lag!

Talk to your kids with higher level vocabulary!
1. Vocabulary:

Choose a word of the week and give a thumbs up for every time one of your kids uses that word in a sentence. The winner earns an easy prize:

• Stay up 15 minutes later (or in bed later in the morning)
• Choose the next cereal to be bought
• 1 chore to be shared by the other kids one time
• A star next to their name on a piece of paper on the fridge

2. Play word games:

Take turns:
-naming something in a category that starts or ends with a letter.
-describing something until someone guesses it.
-going through the alphabet to name an item you would find in a place.

Try having your child read to you!
3. Read:

Reading is the most important thing you can do! If your kids totally resist trips to the library, try these ideas:

     • Try a manga (comic strip pictures)      book.
     • Read the comics together if you get a paper or have computer access.
     • Make something your family loves to eat and have your kids read the recipe to you.

It doesn't matter what you read, just read!
• Have your kids read the labels at
the store to find out how much sugar
or salt are in the food.
• Find a show or movie with subtitles 
that you have free access to and 
take turns reading the script.


Remember, just read!

Tell stories! Kids especially love to hear about when you got in trouble!
4. Tell a story:


      For school practice, the stories have to have a beginning, middle and end that are connected by a main idea. Try these ideas:

     * At a shared meal, tell something about your day.
     * Tell a story about something that you will always remember.
     * Tell about the worst time you ever had at (place.)     
      * Tell about a time you got in trouble when you were little.
     * Tell about the last episode of their favorite tv show. Does it make sense even if you haven’t seen the show?

Tell a wish/hope story, like:
      - If I could travel anywhere...
-If I won a shopping spree at my favorite store...
-If I invented a _____...
-If I was stranded on an island...
-If I had a personal robot...



Your kids are never too young to talk to!
5. TALK!
Remember, your kids are NEVER 
too little to talk to. 
That is how they learn!


Whatever you do, just keep on talking!
Have a great summer!

9 Great Tips for Adapting Materials You Already Own!


Therapy doesn’t always have to be expensive, if you use materials you already have around the house creatively! It also helps if you have garage sales in your neighborhood or if you know people that have kids. Don’t be afraid to ask them to let you go through their kids’ toys and books before they get rid of them!

9 Tips: Adapt Materials for Therapy that You Already Own!
Adapting items you have takes a little time, but building up a supply of activities around a theme makes working with mixed-level groups much easier! Being able to mix and match the materials for different groups’ needs also keeps you from having to do the exact same activity all day long. 


These examples have a pet theme, so fun to do at any time of the year.
Garage sales are great for getting together a theme.


Tip 1: ORGANIZE AND KEEP COLLECTING!

Buy some inexpensive boxes to keep the toys and books you’ve found for each theme all in one place. Add to the theme as you find more inexpensive items.


Puzzles with separate pieces are worth spending some money on.
Tip 2: GET SOME PUZZLES!

If you have students with low-level skills or minimal language, puzzles that have separate pieces of whole items are worth spending some money on.

Students can:
• Request the pet they want to place. (labeling)
• Find the pet that makes the sound. (auditory skills)
• Find the pet who swims, flies, etc.  (action vocabulary)
• Find the pet who eats carrots, wears a collar, etc.  (word association skills)
• Request a black pet, a flying pet, etc. (describing)


Adapt your books and collect containers for play.
Tip 3: BOOKS! MUST HAVE BOOKS!

Find varied books on that theme with different levels and great pictures. This will let you build literacy skills while choosing the book that is easiest to elicit the specific language each group is working on.

Tip 4: ADAPT

Taping symbols over the book text to adapt it to be a simple repetitive book is simple to do. Just adapt the size of the symbols so that the original text is covered and use a wide roll of clear tape that extends past the paper to hold it firmly in place. The book in the photo is still in good shape after 20+ years. Don’t use school tape, though, as it will yellow and peel.

Tip 5: USE BOOKS TO BUILD SYMBOLIC PLAY!
Playing 'feed the animals' is fun!

The book in the photo has repetitive text for what the pets eat. Use craft glue to put small pieces of the foods in the bottom of empty, clean plastic fruit cups. It dried clear, keeping the pieces from falling out and kids from trying to eat them. 

After each page, students put the toy animal in the matching food cup to ‘feed’ them. It makes reading fun and brings the language to life!


Tip 6: MIX & MATCH
Having many items in the same theme to mix and match is so useful!

       • Therapy stays interesting.
       • There’s lots of opportunities to label and use or expand language skills.
       • Combining items in different ways aids generalization.
        • Building skills with different play combinations helps students to develop symbolic play.

A shoebox makes a great pet house for play!
Tip 7: SAVE YOUR SHOEBOXES

(Honestly, I am not a shoe shopaholic but 
little kids grow into new sizes quickly!)
Admittedly, it can be a pain to cut through shoeboxes, but they offer such inexpensive ways to incorporate hands-on fun with lots of language!

After warming up by labeling the pets with 
the puzzle, you can have some pretend play!
"The animals are inside, but they are hungry. Let’s take them out."
 "Who wants to eat first?"
"I think I hear “meow.” What is it? 
Let's open the door!"

You can emphasize concepts, sentence structure, question words, auditory skills, you name it!
Students who are minimally verbal can respond using the pet symbols you made by taking photos of the puzzle pieces, or the puzzle pieces themselves.


Turn worksheets into interactive fun!
Tip 8: TURN WORKSHEETS INTO PLAY!

Worksheets with pictures are great to turn into hands-on activities.

In the photo, you can see examples of:

     • Sticker activities that are laminated and turned into a pet shop game. One set is an enlarged version so that the students had to specify the big/little pet.

     • Shape matching pages turned into a game.

     • Hidden picture pages put into a page protector to make a matching activity using pet symbols. The pictures of the hidden animal were colored in this set for a student who was just beginning to visually discriminate.

• A trading card plastic page that was adapted with symbols for students to match the associated pet and say the sentence.

Construction paper is a basic school supplied material- use it!
Tip 9: USE ANY SUPPLIES 
YOUR SCHOOL OFFERS!

My school had Ellison cutters and construction paper available. Adding pet photos on the back before laminating made a simple game. Students requested the color cat or dog and then turned it over. 

The visual support helped the minimally verbal students form a sentence while the more verbal students used correct grammar in 
their productions.


Thematic materials are great for building speech/language skills!
As always, TpT can save you so much time with high-quality materials! 

Check out my Adapted Books: PETS Themed Activities and add your own toys for some interactive fun!


Enjoy!
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...