End of the Year Games

Need some help for the end of the school year? Some years, your usual therapy routines just don't cut it at the end of the year. This is one of those years for me! What to do? How about changing it up a little?

In my speech room this year, we are playing lots of online games to review skills after some 'work' is done. I have a complete post on this topic at Speech Spotlight- catch it here!

But, for my loyal readers, here's a few more ideas:




Questions

Decide which question word fits the answer.





Read a short passage and roll the cube to answer varied WH questions about it.



Sequence the words to ask a question.






Sentences

Sequence the words to form a sentence.




Add more words to make sentences more interesting.






Do you like these? Then be sure to see my other post at Speech Spotlight!

A Letter to Me- As a New SLP!

What would you say to yourself as a new SLP? Join The Frenzied SLPs!
I hope you are getting close to summer vacation! 

I've joined up with The Frenzied SLPs this week for an exciting linky- what would you write to yourself as a new SLP? This group has so many great ideas! 

My days of being new are long gone, so my letter is... Well, go read it and find out!




Looks-Like-Language- A letter to myself!
Dear (just starting out) Linda@Looks-Like-Language,

Don’t be so scared! Take the plunge! You will learn so much from every student you work with and do some good besides (for almost every one of them. Some people just don’t want to get help or to change, and that is okay since you tried.)

You will have more changes in your career than you are comfortable with, but it will keep you flexible and learning! You will never be bored.

You will gain so many skills and be happy that you made the choice to stay in this field instead of your other major- psychology. But that was a great choice for a double major since so there is so much counseling in speech/language therapy, believe it or not!

There are so many wonderful people in this career and so many choices of how to practice! It is a fulfilling career that can change as you change to meet your needs. You go for it, girl!

Best wishes,

The (ready to retire) Linda@Looks-Like-Language

What advice would you give to yourself as a new SLP?


Problem Solving Freebie- Turning Homework In

Do your students have get into situations that they can't handle? Are their responses limited to "It's NOT fair!" or explaining why they were right over and over again? 
Pull social skills together with this free uit from Looks Like Language.

While this is a normal stage of development for young children, at some point between 8 to 12 years, according to Robert Selman's work on the ability to take another's perspective, this skill should develop when students are exposed to it culturally, socially or educationally. There's an interesting, easy to read article about this here.

Just like every other language skills, our language impaired students are likely to need more direct teaching and more practice to be able to attain this skill. If your students need some work in this area, you might be interested in trying out one of my newest freebies! 

The Getting Work Done unit from the Perspective Taking and Problem Solving series can get your students thinking about and discussing the common problem of being organized. What happens when you don't get your homework turned in? Talk about it, and complete the problem solving worksheets, from different perspectives. Try it out! It is FREE! Just click here.

Enjoy! Linda

Autism: Teaching Play Skills with a Shoebox- Playground

What about play skills for your kids with ASD who don’t even know how to play? You know what I mean if you’ve seen your students do these:
•      Look at a toy and touch it, then walk away.
•      Use a toy inappropriately.
•      Play only with the same toy over and over.
•      Instead of playing, just lining up the cars/figures/blocks.

Tips for expanding the play skills of your students with autism!

To begin building their play skills, they need 3D play items all the way! 

So you have an excuse to go buy a new pair of shoes! Just joking, but be sure to save some shoeboxes.

Autism: Using shoeboxes to teach play skills by Looks Like Language
WHY A SHOEBOX?

Placing toys on a shoebox to demonstrate play has a few benefits:

* It stabilizes the pieces for kids with fine motor issues.

* The velcro helps the kids see where they need to move the figures.

* The hole at the end makes the pieces disappear to show that the task is finished.

The box stores all of the pieces nicely. Just take out two figures to start: one to model with and one for the child to move.

Increase the number of figures as the student learns the task. Then work on fading the box out of the play routine if the child’s ability to manipulate has improved with practice.

Shoebox Play for the Playground


Scrounge around for playground toys and figures that go with them if you don’t already have them. If you are lucky, you may find some inexpensive pieces at flea markets and yard sales!

Autism: Using shoeboxes to teach play skills by Looks Like Language
Your main playground piece goes in the middle. 
Leave room for 3-5 figures to fit on the box as if they were waiting in line to play.  

After you have them placed, draw a box at the other end for the figures to exit into. Having a visually clear ‘all done is SO important for working with ASD students, as it makes new tasks less overwhelming for them.

If the set up is clear visually, your students should be able to either imitate your model or move the figures with hand over hand physical prompting. This is not a following directions task! 

Once your students show that they have the idea, fade out whatever prompts you were using and then shoebox, as well! 

The photos to the left show two different playground play sequences for teaching kids who have very limited play skills and need steps broken down. 

Autism: Using shoeboxes to teach play skills by Looks Like Language
The sliding board photos show what the sequence of play could look like when your student is ready to have the shoebox removed. Notice how all of the figures disappear after the play sequence?

Once the physical movements of the play sequence are easy, it is time to add the language! 

The first step is using photos of your play sequence to make an adapted book and add the language there. 

Then move on to different play sequences. Adapted books and file folder sentence activities are my preferred way to go!

Don’t worry about adapting the toys with velcro, since your higher level students can still use them to play. Just take them out of the box! They may ask you at first why there is velcro on the toys, but then they ignore it. 

Warning: Don’t do what I did and store the pieces with velcro in a hot attic like I did and get a sticky mess! :(


Getting Started with Autism- free download from Looks Like Language!

Did you get the free Getting Started with Autism Guide yet? Check it out by clicking here

Don't miss this helpful freebie!

Enjoy! Linda

Scrounging for Therapy- Tips for Inexpensive Therapy Materials

Scrounging for therapy? Absolutely!

Preschoolers need to play, so that means you need a variety of materials to match your themes. Yes, it is extra work in the beginning, but the lovely thing about it is that once you have accumulated enough treasures, you can work on a wide variety of goals in your groups since the theme ties it all together!

Scrounging for Therapy- Tips for Adapting Inexpensive Materials
There are many inexpensive books, activities and other materials made for entertaining preschoolers that can easily be adapted for therapy. Surprisingly enough, you won't always find these at the Target Dollar Spot or the Dollar Store.

Keep your eyes open for sweet finds at pharmacies, grocery stores and other places where kids can get antsy!

Besides books, preschoolers often need props for everything to learn to play. Gather up as many theme related 3D items as you can at yard sales, supplement them with boxes, containers and assorted junk, and fill in the rest with paper pictures.

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
You know by now that I love page protectors. When I opened up the ones in my playground binder, these are the goodies that I found. 

The Playground Game is an open ended picture game from an old Sesame Street magazine. Remember that I recommended you look out for them at garage sales in my last post? This is a good example of why you should! You can easily make your own version, though with a great photo from a children's book or from a Google search. Just laminate it and cut it into large, simple shapes.

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
Check out this Sesame Street playground picture that got turned into a File Folder Sentence Activity! This is how the whole set got started.

This one was made for a student of mine who loved The Wiggles. It worked so well, I tried to figure out a way to use it for my more concrete kids at play level and developed File Folder Activities.


Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
To the right is a plastic cling activity – heaven knows where I found it, but I sure wish I could draw like that! These activities are fun for giving directions and describing. Tell the student which kid to find by describing them. Then give directions for where exactly to place it in the picture.

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
Next comes a simple adapted book for the playground. It works well because there is one playground item per page with simple drawings to elicit the action as well as the label. If you work in a school, the Scholastic flyers the classrooms send out can be a great source for inexpensive books. 

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
Next is an example of a work sheet from a very old workbook that was modified to use an open ended group game. After providing a response, the students took a child and figured out where to put the picture based on how the child was moving. 

Work on expressive skills when the activity is done using a clean up game. Students love to be the teacher, so have them take turns telling about one of the pieces. If they used their target correctly, they picked up that piece. Count to see who got the most, and then everyone puts their picture back in the bag. Language and putting away help all at the same time!

But, what about the kids who don’t even know how to play? Come back next week to get some tips!

Enjoy!
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