Showing posts with label Mixed Groups. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Mixed Groups. Show all posts

Take Me Out to the Ball Game! Week 1

When you start hearing cicadas in the Northeast, it means the World Series is not too far away! It was time for a new free download for my loyal followers, so what is better to finish the summer and start the fall than a baseball game?

Make mixed groups easier! Get the newest free open ended activity from Looks Like Language!

Of course, you can download it now and play it next spring, or any time you'd like! There will be weekly downloads until you get the basic game packet, but be sure to open my newsletters to get the complete free packet (plus some extras) if you follow me.

You don't? Well, if you are interested, just sign up  on my blog! You are already here!

Who's up for some Cracker Jacks?

Try out this FREE unit for Getting Homework Done from Looks Like Language!
If you work with (or have your own) elementary level students who hate doing homework, you might also want to download this free Getting Work Done unit from my store. It's part of a popular bundle that helps children develop language for better problem solving skills.

Enjoy!




Spring Fun Freebie 4

I'm excited to tell you that the last section of my updated Spring Fun Freebie has a new printable worksheet for sorting what belongs in spring time. You can download it here.

Grab this open ended, free printable game and worksheet set from Looks Like Language!
Every month you can get a complete, free packet for basic skills by stopping here for Freebie Friday.

My newsletter followers get the complete set in one download to make their lives easier!


Going to the playground definitely belongs in spring!

Learn playground labels, actions and rules with the activity packed At the Playground! set.
This activity packed literacy set build vocabulary for playground equipment and actions, spatial concepts to answer Where questions, and a variety of worksheets to make your mixed groups easier!

Check out At the Playground at my store.

Enjoy! Linda

Exciting News at Looks Like Language!

Do you ever feel like the list of things you need to do is unmanageable? And then, how happy and relieved do you feel when you accomplish something on that list?

Then, celebrate with me!

First, I am so excited to have my Speech and Language Activities: Roll It, Say It, Write It! featured in the TpT newsletter! You can get it here.







Check out the new Boom Cards internet no prep, no print activities at Looks Like Language!
Next, I have been thinking for a long time about how I could make some no prep, no print materials that  are interactive, fun and easy to use (and also did not require me to jump through hoops to learn a complicated technology.)

I’m thrilled to have found a solution!  I am starting to incorporate quick and easy Boom Learning card sets into my printable sets, so you can have the best of both worlds! I just hope that you are as excited as I am when you try out my free and preview sets. My sets let your students drag the right answers on the page, and give them another chance if they make a mistake. So fun!

Give BOOM Cards a try!

Get your free no print, no prep internet activity set for mixed groups at Looks Like Language now!
Kids are sure to have fun with this interactive car themed activity that incorporates words with ’R’ sounds for articulation practice, WH questions and categories. Get the answer right to power up your car!

Download it here.



You can also try out free trials of paid activities to see if they are right for you.

Get your free trial and spread a little kindness! Looks Like Language!
How about spreading some kindness? There are two levels that coordinate with my matching printable set.

Acts of kindness is a picture level set for students to find the kind action and drag it to their kindness plate to fill it up with some yummy cupcakes.



Get a free trial of interactive learning for emotions vocabulary at Looks Like Language!
Working on vocabulary for emotions and character traits to help your students discuss kind and unkind actions? Try the free trial of Vocabulary for Acts of Kindness (requires some reading.)



After you’ve given them a try, I’d love for you to provide feedback at my store as a thank you!

Enjoy! Linda

Free Fun Fall Activity for Multiple Speech & Language Skills

Get this FREE, fun fall freebie from Looks Like Language!
It is back to school time, so fall isn't far behind! We have to do a lot of informal assessments to get started on the right track, so why not make your planning easier with a fun fall freebie?

This photo game set and writing worksheet will let you address a multitude of speech and language skills, whether you are in the classroom or working in your office. Try it out here!

Trash to Treasure- Junk to Save Your Session

Trash to treasure: Ideas for using junk in therapy from Looks Like Language
Turning work into play is a great way to get through the end of the year, sometimes even for older students! It works, especially well when you combine elements of all of the goals from the year to see how well they can use the skills.

What is needed? Junk!  In the photo, you can see some of my life saving junk from this year. The empty egg cartons and ravioli trays are from my house. The foam cubes, colored dice, pompoms, mini erasers and plastic colored discs are from varied dollar place outings. 

Spinners are very easy to make and can be personalized or changed out easily by taping something new on top of the laminated clear spinner. Tape on some words or pictures and get out the organizers your students have used during the year to play a wide variety of language games. Then, just mix and match!

Here's how to create your own.

Trash to treasure: Ideas for using junk in therapy from Looks Like Language

THINK
1.  Determine which skills the majority of your students have worked on this year.
2. Think about what vocabulary or skills for using new words that your students have learned this year.
3. What skills can tie this all together?  Ideas include questions, grammatical forms, sentence structures, and articulation targets or carrier phrases.

Trash to treasure: Ideas for using junk in therapy from Looks Like Language

CREATE 
1.  How long are each of these lists? Place the information that your students have in common on the container or spinner that will fit it best.
2. Get some type of easy to toss item, like mini erasers, pompoms, plastic chips, or packing peanuts, if you have a container.
3. Make a spinner, adapt a cube, or use dice. Dice are fun and easy to use by making a grid with different skills for each number, or by numbering 6 pictures to talk about.
4. Personalize the activities by using an organizer, vocabulary list, or some specific skill for each student.
5. The more of these items you combine in an activity, the longer or more complicated the responses will be. The benefit is that it will require your students to combine multiple skills, demonstrating mastery and making them think. The drawback can be the time required, so I have my students spin, roll, toss, etc. while the other students are responding. An additional benefit for my ADHD kids is that this helps them wait for their turn without getting in trouble!

PLAY
Try all different kinds of combinations! You will find out which activities your students love and how your goals fit best with your junk! On days when I know that I'm not going to get any 'work' responses from my upset students, I pull out one of these activities to save the day.

How do you save the day?

Getting Through the End of the Year

Introducing the weird and unusual in photos is a method that grabs kids’ attention and makes it easier to get through to the end of the school year.
Getting through to the end of the school year using odd photos! Looks Like Language

Want to prove it? Try leaving some of these photos on your desk, or leave them up on your computer (if you can access them at school) when you go to get your next group. Watch how quickly one of your students will notice them and start commenting!


Check out some of these links to see if you have the right students/age groups to make use of this idea. I love finding these sites!  One word of warning, though- some of these sites have a mix of both school appropriate and inappropriate images! Check all images out ahead of time to see if they are good for your caseload. You can also take screenshots of the ones you like to avoid the pictures you don’t want your students to see. 

Animals
Of all the types of weird photos that I’ve tried, my students seem drawn to animal photos the most. With all of the photoshopped animals out there, it is easy to find weird mixes. Questions to answer include:
What kind of animals made up this weird one?
What can this animal do? Why would it be good to combine these skills?
How is it the same/different from each original animal?

A duck bunny from




Houses
There are some very unusual houses in this world and lots of photos on the internet. They easily prompt a discussion with questions including:
Would you like to live here? Why or why not?
What would be a good thing about living in this house? A problem?
How is this the same as where you live? Different?




Go random!
Try one of these.






Or how about this one from http://europeanchicdesign.blogspot.com/2011_02_01_archive.html? (Scroll down a ways to get to it.)






After your students have the language skills to discuss the photos, you can follow up with another activity- describing! Lay your chosen pictures on your table and let your students take turns describing a picture without labeling anything! If they are able to get you or another student to guess the correct picture, they get to keep that picture. If they goof and label something in the picture, their turn ends. This can be harder than it seems for language impaired students to do! See who has the most pictures when time is up. 

Do you have artic kids? They have to follow the same language goals, but also produce their sound correctly while playing.  Fluency? Have them practice the strategies used this year while describing!


I hope your students have a blast with this activity! Be sure to share the links if you have a favorite interesting, weird, bizarre photo site or another fun way to use the pictures!

Scrounging for Therapy

Scrounging for therapy? Absolutely!

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
Preschoolers need to play, so that means you need a variety of materials to match your themes. Yes, it is extra work in the beginning, but the lovely thing about it is that once you have accumulated enough treasures, you can work on a wide variety of goals in your groups since the theme ties it all together!

So here’s some pictures of how I scrounged for speech therapy materials for preschoolers before the times of the beautiful sets you can get from TpT!

Preschoolers often need props for everything to learn to play. I gathered up as many 3D items as I could, supplemented with boxes, containers and assorted junk, and filled in the rest with paper pictures.

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
When I opened up my plastic sleeve of playground items, these are the goodies that I found. The Playground Game, top left, is an open ended picture game from an old Sesame Street magazine. Remember that I recommended you look out for them at garage sales in my last post? This is a good example why!

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
If I don't have you convinced, check out this Sesame Street playground picture that I turned into a File Folder Sentence Activity! This is how they got started.


Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
On top is a plastic cling activity – heaven knows where I found it, but I sure wish I could draw like that! These activities are fun for giving directions and describing. Tell the student which kid to find by describing them. Then give directions for where exactly to place it in the picture.

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
Next comes a simple adapted book for the playground. I like it because there is one playground item per page and in use, which let me elicit the action as well as the label. If you work in a school, the Scholastic flyers the classrooms send out can be a great source for inexpensive books. You can also join on line.

Scrounging for therapy- inexpensive ideas from Looks Like Language!
On the bottom is an example of a work sheet from a very old workbook that I modified to be an activity.  I used it as an open ended group game. After providing a response, the students took a child and figured out where to put the picture based on how the child was moving. 

Then I used a CLEAN UP GAME. My students took turns telling me about what one of the kids was doing. If they used their target correctly, they picked up the child. Count to see who got the most, and then everyone puts their picture back in the bag. Language and putting away help all at the same time!

But, what about the kids who don’t even know how to play? Come back next week to get some tips!

7 Creative Tips for Using Dice in Speech/Language Therapy

How do you make 'work' more fun for middle school students? It can be quite the challenge! My middle school students function at an elementary school level in many areas, but as they've gotten older, they aren't as interested in board games as they once were. 


Being creative with dice to motivate your students!

Using dice has come to my rescue on more than one occasion when dealing with disinterested middle schoolers! Of course, elementary school students will love these games, too!


BASIC OPEN ENDED GAME

The basic, open ended game can be used for almost any goal. It is so easy to keep around and pull out when students are refusing to work. All you have to do is divide a sheet of paper into 6 sections and number each box.


Using dice in speech therapy makes it more fun! Looks-Like-Language

The students can even do this themselves, choosing their color paper and deciding which of their targets will go in each box. 


Besides the fact that giving students choices can make them more willing to participate, the act of deciding gets them thinking and talking about what they have been learning in speech. 




Each student can be giving different types of responses and still play the same game! In the photo below, the student on the left is practicing /r/ in the final position. To get even more productions, have the student say the word the number of times that is rolled! The student on the right is using pronouns to tell about the pictures 


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Articulation-Game-110-Picture-Cards-for-R-Speech-Therapy-1869077
STOP & GO GAME

How about using dice to get 100 productions of a target sound? This game makes it easier!

Cover a die with red and green paper on the sides and put tape over it. Students roll the die and keep producing words with their sounds until they make a mistake or roll a stop. Then it is the next student's turn. 

While they are waiting, they can place checks in the boxes, color or dot them if you keep track of how many productions they did. The first student to get 100 correct productions wins!

I made this into a freebie for you! Get it here.


Using dice in speech therapy makes it more fun! Looks-Like-Language
DICE BINGO
Did you ever play Bingo with dice?  If you use two different colors to number the boxes, students can roll to see which box to answer about and cover.

This is a great visual way to build math skills for co-ordinates and quadrants and your students won't even realize it! 


Using dice in speech therapy makes it more fun! Looks-Like-Language
DICE CONNECT 3

Connect 3 is a fun game that can easily be played with dice and a page with boxes!  I like to use different colored boxes to match my dice. Then I hide the dice in a bag and let the student take one out to roll.

After responding about the target in the matching box, they write their initials in the box. Any time that they fill in an adjacent box, they connect them. The person who connects three, or has the most pairs, is the winner.

Using dice in speech therapy makes it more fun! Looks-Like-Language
DICE NARRATIVES

Narratives are such an important skill, which so many of my students lack. I bought some sets of soft foam math cubes at the Dollar Store and covered them with the stickers from my Story Grammar Marker set. I covered them with tape and I was ready to go!

Use any pictures that contain some story elements to get your students started. Students roll the dice and tell the information they want to add to their story. 

I have done this orally to help my students practice formulating correct sentence structures, but you could have students write their answers and form a written narrative, too. When they have figured out all of the elements, it is time to tell the story!


Using dice in speech therapy makes it more fun! Looks-Like-Language
DICE VOCABULARY REVIEW

For a quick vocabulary review game, have each student write 6 of their target words on an index card. They roll the die to see which word to define and use in a sentence correctly to earn a point. I give them 7-10 rolls each and see which student got the most points when I need it to be quick!





Using dice in speech therapy makes it more fun! Looks-Like-Language
SPINNERS & DICE

To change things up a bit, sometimes I combine spinners and dice! My students need lots of practice formulating ideas into sentences, so sometimes I have them spin to get one idea to use and roll to get the other idea, then combine them in a concise, correct sentence.

The photo shows this idea using action photos  along with a question spinner, found in some of my sets. Students roll to get the picture to use and then spin the spinner to ask or answer using that question word about their picture.

My students often need thinking time before responding, so I like to do one round where everyone rolls  and another round where they take turns giving their answers. It may take a little more time, but I have found that the added co-operativeness and willingness to do the activity for longer compensate for the extra time! 

How do you use dice in therapy?

Enjoy! Linda

Putting Mixed Group Tips to Work: You Can Do It!

 5 tips to make mixed groups work! Looks Like Language
Mixed groups can be challenging until you get the hang of it! You can do it with these tips!  How do you actually put all of these tips for mixed groups to use? Last post, I shared my ideas while highlighting a packet that includes multiple skills. This week I will show you a different approach, along with some ideas for how to modify materials to meet more needs.

If you are new to this series, you can start here.

Mixed Groups! You can do it! Looks-Like-Language
TIP: Have fun activities!
Once you know the kinds of activities that the students in your groups like, you can come up with a multitude of variations that will get you through the year. 

* Game boards are a Must Have Around!

* Spinners are great with game boards, but many (like the pictured one) can be used as stand alone activities.

* Use dice and the game cards. Just write numbers on the backs of the cards and let them roll to find their card.

TIP: Do a bit of planning!
With some creative thinking and a bit of planning, you can incorporate different goals into the fun activity you have planned for the majority of the group. 

Mixed Groups! You can do it! Looks-Like-Language
*Articulation: Use the target sounds in the responses. I believe that placing language demands along with the articulation effort really helps students along the way to carryover! You can make a list of words or let higher level students figure out one on their own.

* Grammar: Tell a sentence using the target to tell about each picture. 

* Ask and Answer Questions: Have the students interact verbally, by asking and answering questions with each other about the situations before their turn ends. Fostering interaction skills is so important!

* Vocabulary: Incorporate one of the words they have already learned into their responses, or add a new word, such as rue!

* Describing- Add # descriptive words in their sentences.

Mixed Groups! You can do it! Looks-Like-Language
TIP: Organize it!
Finding great organizers makes it so much easer to extend the activities and see if your students have really learned the concept. For the pictured organizers, applying the skills to short YouTube clips and books is a great way to do this. They work well for for including more goals, too! 

* Speech/Language: Apply all of the 'Adapt it' goals to use with the organizer. 

* Social Language: Cause-effect is a vital skill for social situations! Can your students predict what will happen as an effect or consequence of their words and actions?

* Social Language: Thinking of multiple causes and multiple effects in social situations is a great way to expand perspective taking and thinking more flexibly!

Mixed Groups! You can do it! Looks-Like-Language
TIP: Adapt materials to add another goal!

Use the templates to add more goals to the sets.

* Students draw or write their own card sets as an activity after teaching to consolidate skills. 

* Students make their own card sets before playing the game to get baseline data.

* Send the templates home for students to fill in for homework. To get started, fill in part of the organizer together in school so there is one completed example. This also lets you write quick notes on the worksheet to explain anything your student found confusing.

* Take away the pictures and words after you have completed the activities to see if students can use the visual to help them organize their own thoughts independently.

Mixed Groups! You can do it! Looks-Like-Language
TIP: Find materials with multiple levels in one goal area.

While this is perfect for starting one student at the lowest skill level and building abilities to a higher level, it also allows students at different levels in this skill to interact with each other. 

Letting one student explain something to another student, like playing teacher, can be a great way to consolidate skills for the one student while letting the other student hear the perspective that made it click for his peer.

Having a variety of materials in one set makes your job easier, too. One student can sequence 2 pictures to play the game, another can work on sentences, while others read the passage silently while waiting and tell the answer when it is their turn.

Working with mixed groups is quite possible. I hope my tips help! If you'd like to try out my Explaining Cause-Effect Activities packet and put these tips to quick use, get it here! Enjoy!
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