Showing posts with label Language. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Language. Show all posts

Dream BIG with Martin Luther King, Jr & a free download!

Happy 2019!

I hope that this year will be a happy, healthy and productive year for you! Happy and healthy are up to you, but I can help out with productive!

Since I love helping out SLPs and SPED folks, I have started a new freebie set for older students this year. We can never have enough materials, can we?

There will a new, open-ended print and go game for you to use each month. More often if life events permit! 

Get a year's worth of free open ended games growing bundle at Looks Like Language!
This month, I have a free open-ended printable game board for incorporating a Martin Luther King, Jr. theme with therapy skills. Just print, go, be creative and have fun! Download it here.














I also have a special offer for this year only!
Every month, my newsletter subscribers will have access to an expanded version of the Friday Freebie!

Get a year's worth of free open ended games growing bundle at Looks Like Language!
You know that I love making materials with visuals that accommodate mixed levels/skills groups. The expanded freebies will help with exactly that!

All you have to do is sign up on the dreaded pop-up. Maybe not so dreaded this year?

Every month, you will get early access to my growing bundle of open-ended print and go game boards. The link will only be active for the current month, but you will get a new access link at the beginning of each month once you sign up.

It will only be free in 2019, so take advantage of the offer and sign up now!

Enjoy!

Building Sentences about Thanksgiving Freebie

The only thing better than talking about food is eating it! Help your students build sentences to communicate about food activities this Thanksgiving with this easy to use free download.

Since I love to help you out with mixed groups, this free download has two versions so that students at different levels can do the same activity.


Build Thanksgiving Sentences in mixed groups with this free download.
This week's download is the lower level part of the set. The parts of speech for the sentences have color coded borders that coordinate with Proloquo and many other AAC systems. There is color coding on the game cards, as well, to make sequencing the words in the sentences easier.

Not only that, but you can choose whether students need to complete 1, 2, or 3 sentences during the activity, according to their ability levels. 

We all like to talk about foods! It is great also for providing visual supports for after the holiday to help students communicate about what they did at home.

Get your free download here, and be sure to come back next week for the other set!

Enjoy!

3 NO COST Tips to Help STOP Summer Time Lag!


Did you know that students who don’t keep expanding their vocabulary over the summer come back to school in the fall lagging behind their peers who continued learning?

It is just one way to measure growth, but is closely tied to many skills needed for school success.

Parents, what you do with your children at home is so important! You CAN help your kids to be better prepared for school each and every year. These ideas are NO COST, but they do take a bit of time. And you don't even need to leave your home for most of these!

Stop your kids' summer time lag with these no cost tips from Looks Like Language!
3 tips to help stop that summer time lag!

Vocabulary:

Choose a word of the week and give a thumbs up for every time one of your kids uses that word in a sentence. The winner earns an easy prize:
• Stay up 15 minutes later (or in bed later in the morning)
• Choose the next cereal to be bought
• 1 chore to be shared by the other kids one time
• A star next to their name on a piece of paper on the fridge
• Play word games where you take turns:
-naming something in a category that starts or ends with a letter.
-describing something until someone guesses it.
-going through the alphabet to name an item you would find in a place.

Read:

Reading is the most important thing you can do! If your kids totally resist trips to the library, try these ideas:

• Try a manga (comic strip pictures) book.
• Read the comics together if you get a paper or have computer access.
• Make something your family loves to eat and have your kids read the recipe to you.
• Have your kids read the labels at the store to find out how much sugar or salt are in the food.
• Find a show or movie with subtitles that you have access to and take turns reading the script.


Tell a story:


For school practice, the stories have to have a beginning, middle and end that are connected by a main idea. Try these ideas:
• At a shared meal, tell something about your day.
• Tell a story about something that you will always remember.
• Tell about the worst time you ever had at (place)
• Tell about the last episode of their favorite tv show. Does it make sense even if you haven’t seen the show?
• Tell a wish/hope story, like:
      - If I could could travel anywhere...
-If I won a shopping spree at my favorite store...
-If I invented a _____...
-If I was stranded on an island...
-If I had a personal robot...

Whatever you do, just keep on talking!
Have a great summer! Enjoy- Linda

9 Great Tips for Adapting Materials You Already Own!

9 Tips: Adapt Materials for Therapy that You Already Own!

Therapy doesn’t always have to be expensive, if you use materials you already have around the house creatively! It also helps if you have garage sales in your neighborhood or if you know people that have kids. Don’t be afraid to ask them to let you go through their kids’ toys and books before they get rid of them!

Adapting items you have takes a little time, but building up a supply of activities around a theme makes working with mixed level groups much easier! Being able to mix and match the materials for different groups’ needs also keeps you from having to do the exact same activity all day long. These examples have a pet theme; so fun to do in the spring.

Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
Tip 1: ORGANIZE AND KEEP COLLECTING!
Buy some inexpensive boxes to keep the toys and books you’ve found for each theme all in one place. Add to the theme as you find inexpensive items.


Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
Tip 2: GET SOME PUZZLES!
If you have students with low level skills or minimal language, puzzles that have separate pieces of whole items are worth spending some money for.
Students can:
• Request the pet they want to place. (labeling)
• Find the pet that makes the sound. (auditory skills)
• Find the pet who swims, flies, etc.  (action vocabulary)
• Find the pet who eats carrots, wears a collar, etc.  (word association skills)
• Request a black pet, a flying pet, etc. (describing)

Tip 3: BOOKS! MUST HAVE BOOKS!
Find varied books on that theme with different levels and great pictures. This will let you build literacy skills while choosing the book that is easiest to elicit the specific language each groups is working on.

Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
Tip 4: ADAPT


Taping symbols over the book text to adapt it to be a simple repetitive book is simple to do. Just adapt the size of the symbols so that the original text is covered and use a wide roll of clear tape that extends past the paper to hold it firmly in place. The book in the photo is still in good shape after 20 years. Don’t use school tape, though, as it will yellow and peel.

Tip 5: USE BOOKS TO BUILD SYMBOLIC PLAY!
This book has repetitive text for what the pets eat. Use craft glue to put small pieces of the foods in the bottom of empty, clean plastic fruit cups. It dried clear, keeping the pieces from falling out and kids from trying to eat them. After each page, the students could put the toy animal in the matching food cup to ‘feed’ them.

Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
Tip 6: MIX & MATCH!

Having many items in the same theme to mix and match is so useful!
• Therapy stays interesting
• There’s lots of opportunities to label and use or expand language skills.
• Combining items in different ways aids generalization.
• Building skills with different play combinations helps students to develop symbolic play.

Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
   Tip 7: SAVE YOUR SHOEBOXES
(Honestly, I am not a shoe shopaholic but little kids grow into new sizes quickly!)
Admittedly, it can be a pain to cut through shoeboxes, but they offer such inexpensive ways to incorporate hands on fun and lots of language!

After warming up by labeling the pets with the puzzle, you can have some pretend play!
"The animals are inside, but they are hungry. Let’s take them out."
 "Who wants to eat first?"
"I think I hear “meow.” What is it? Let's open a door!"

You can emphasize concepts, sentence structure, question words, auditory skills, you name it!
Students who are minimally verbal can respond using the pet symbols you made by taking photos of the puzzle pieces, or the puzzle pieces themselves.


Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
Tip 8: TURN WORKSHEETS INTO PLAY!
Worksheets with pictures are great to turn into hands on activities.
In the photo, you can see examples of:
• Sticker activities that are laminated and turned into a pet shop game. One set is an enlarged version so that the students had to specify the big/little pet.
• Shape matching pages turned into a game.
• Hidden picture pages put into a page protector to make a matching activity using pet symbols. The pictures of the hidden animal were colored in this set for a student who was just beginning to visually discriminate.
• A trading card plastic page that was adapted with symbols for students to match the associated pet and say the sentence.

Check out these 9 easy to implement tips for adapting materials you already own for therapy!
   Tip 9: USE ANY SUPPLIES YOUR SCHOOL OFFERS!
My school had Ellison cutters and construction paper available. Adding pet photos on the back before laminating made a simple game. Students requested the color cat or dog and then turned it over. 

The visual support helped the minimally verbal students form a sentence while the more verbal students used correct grammar in their productions.


https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Adapted-Books-for-Autism-and-Speech-PETS-Themed-Activities-3121563
As always, TpT can save you so much time with high quality materials! 

Check out my Adapted Books: PETS Themed Activities and add your own toys for some interactive fun!


Enjoy!

St. Patrick's Day Activities 4


St. Patrick's Day, free, printable, activities, game

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

I'm posting this a bit early this week so that you have time to download and use the last cards of the set this week. I told you that I was having fun updating this set, and I just kept going!

You can do so much with this free set! Play the open ended board game to work on any skill, print duplicate sets of the cards for matching fun, and elicit language for spatial concepts and possessive pronouns! Download it here.

Did you miss the rest of the set? You still have time, just click here.

Lucky you! Enjoy!

3 Tips to Help Children Handle 'NO'


How in the world do you teach kids to accept ‘no’? If I had a sure fire way to teach and  guarantee this, my name would be known world wide!

no, temper, tantrum, meltdown, choice boards
My friend, Lisette, over at Speech Sprouts, asked what I did to help kids understand and accept 'no'. It takes a lot of work and very few 2-3 year olds will easily accept 'no' for something they truly want! But there are some strategies you can use to help kids start moving along the path to accepting ‘no.’

Don’t ask a yes/no question! Give choices instead.
Be careful how you word your questions! Asking a child, “Do you want A ?” implies that you are asking them for their wishes. This leaves it open for them to say, “No, I want B.” when B is not an option. Then you have to say “No.”

Instead, try “Today we have A or B. Which one do you want?” While some kids will then reply, “I want C!” this leaves it open for you to say, “I like C, too, but today we get to pick from A or B.”  You notice that this response did not include the ‘N’ word! Sometimes just hearing that word sets some kids off!

Choice Boards
To do this visually, use a choice board! Visuals are important to help kids see the choices, even for verbal kids. While they see the 'no’ symbol, they also see that there will be other choices available. Without the visual, they will hear the 'no' and can have a meltdown before processing the other choices.

Carefully Sequence the Options
First, help your students understand 'no' (whether visually or verbally) in the context of structured activities where it doesn't have an emotional impact. Then build up to hearing ‘no’ when it actually is something that the child wants, after they have seen that there will be other options that are good, even if not their #1 choice.

Note: Some students may just not be able to handle ‘no’ for various reasons, but don’t make the mistake of giving in to tantrums or outbursts by giving them what they want! As painful as it can be to out wait a sobbing or screaming child, you will only be making it more likely that it will continue if you give in!

Work a deliberate sequence of choices into your daily routines, but don't start with your kids' most favorite choices. Here is one way it could be done.

Make the ‘NO’ choice a 'no' for someone else.

See this picture? I  never had a kid get upset when they couldn't feed a make believe chocolate cookie in shoebox play. To read more about this, click here.

no, temper, tantrum, meltdown, choice boards
   •Make the ‘no’ choice something that the child doesn’t like.
This is a great place to start for kids who just react to the word. Hearing ’no’ gets a bit of desensitization when it is used for something unwanted.

no, temper, tantrum, meltdown, choice boards
Make the ‘no’ one of 3 equally liked choices.
Switch them around from day to day.

no, temper, tantrum, meltdown, choice boards
    •Make the ‘no’ the 2nd favorite, where the favorite choice is available.

no, temper, tantrum, meltdown, choice boards
Make the ‘no’ the favorite choice, with the 2nd favorite available.
 It also helps to have an empty chocolate chip cookie bag available for the child to see that there are no cookies in it. This can make settling for 2nd choice easier.

Build sabotage into your daily routines!
One day the crayon box can be empty, so kids have to choose from markers or colored pencils instead.
One day, the Lego basket is empty, so they have to choose a different building toy instead.

You get the idea! Learning that there are changes and new choices to be made in life is tough learning for little ones, especially anxious little ones! But by presenting it in a way where there are positive outcomes as well as negative ones, many children can start to take it in better stride.  No miracles, just slow, hard work.

Good luck!

Summer Rhyming Fun- 2- A Freebie

Have fun rhyming with this FREE game from Looks Like Language!
Welcome back! I hope you are having a wonderful summer!

This week you get to download the second part of my rhyming game freebie! 

Parents, I know that you have heard that you need to make sure that your children know their colors, numbers, shapes and alphabet to be ready for school. That is helpful, but you will be doing them an even better turn if you read to them and play word and sound games with them!

When children get exposed to rhymes and word games, they start learning about sounds and how they go together into words. This is such an important skill for reading!

So, download this free game now and have fun!

Summer Rhyming Fun- 1- A Freebie

Have some free rhyming fun this summer! Looks Like Language
Rhymes are a great way to get started with pre-reading skills for little ones!

Curl up together with great book- Dr. Seuss is the gold standard for fun rhyming! After the book becomes familiar, try pausing before reading the rhyme and see if your child fills it in!

On a rainy day, when you are stuck inside, you can also play a game! Download this freebie and have fun!


A FREE and Easy Printable Game Board!

Download this FREE printable game board that lets you review any skills! Looks Like Language
Hello! I'm glad you stopped by to download this free printable game board! You can use it with any of my free card sets or use it to review your own work!

As the school year progresses, it can be harder to keep your students' attention when they want to be outside in the nicer weather. Try a game!

You can download it here. Enjoy! Linda

Autism: Teaching Play Skills with a Shoebox- Playground

What about play skills for your kids with ASD who don’t even know how to play? You know what I mean if you’ve seen your students do these:
•      Look at a toy and touch it, then walk away.
•      Use a toy inappropriately.
•      Play only with the same toy over and over.
•      Instead of playing, just lining up the cars/figures/blocks.

Tips for expanding the play skills of your students with autism!

To begin building their play skills, they need 3D play items all the way! 

So you have an excuse to go buy a new pair of shoes! Just joking, but be sure to save some shoeboxes.

Autism: Using shoeboxes to teach play skills by Looks Like Language
WHY A SHOEBOX?

Placing toys on a shoebox to demonstrate play has a few benefits:

* It stabilizes the pieces for kids with fine motor issues.

* The velcro helps the kids see where they need to move the figures.

* The hole at the end makes the pieces disappear to show that the task is finished.

The box stores all of the pieces nicely. Just take out two figures to start: one to model with and one for the child to move.

Increase the number of figures as the student learns the task. Then work on fading the box out of the play routine if the child’s ability to manipulate has improved with practice.

Shoebox Play for the Playground


Scrounge around for playground toys and figures that go with them if you don’t already have them. If you are lucky, you may find some inexpensive pieces at flea markets and yard sales!

Autism: Using shoeboxes to teach play skills by Looks Like Language
Your main playground piece goes in the middle. 
Leave room for 3-5 figures to fit on the box as if they were waiting in line to play.  

After you have them placed, draw a box at the other end for the figures to exit into. Having a visually clear ‘all done is SO important for working with ASD students, as it makes new tasks less overwhelming for them.

If the set up is clear visually, your students should be able to either imitate your model or move the figures with hand over hand physical prompting. This is not a following directions task! 

Once your students show that they have the idea, fade out whatever prompts you were using and then shoebox, as well! 

The photos to the left show two different playground play sequences for teaching kids who have very limited play skills and need steps broken down. 

Autism: Using shoeboxes to teach play skills by Looks Like Language
The sliding board photos show what the sequence of play could look like when your student is ready to have the shoebox removed. Notice how all of the figures disappear after the play sequence?

Once the physical movements of the play sequence are easy, it is time to add the language! 

The first step is using photos of your play sequence to make an adapted book and add the language there. 

Then move on to different play sequences. Adapted books and file folder sentence activities are my preferred way to go!

Don’t worry about adapting the toys with velcro, since your higher level students can still use them to play. Just take them out of the box! They may ask you at first why there is velcro on the toys, but then they ignore it. 

Warning: Don’t do what I did and store the pieces with velcro in a hot attic like I did and get a sticky mess! :(


Getting Started with Autism- free download from Looks Like Language!

Did you get the free Getting Started with Autism Guide yet? Check it out by clicking here

Don't miss this helpful freebie!

Enjoy! Linda
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