More Shoebox Play Tips: EAT! A Visual Blog Post

Hi! I'm glad you are here! 


More ideas for shoebox play (EAT!) and how to develop skills from there!
I was so excited to be featured on The Speechie Show and wanted to give you some more ideas about the shoebox play I showed there.

If you missed it, you can see me live here!

If you are looking for more shoebox play ideas, click here for car play and here for playground ideas.

With neurotypical children, the goal of therapy is to develop as many of the missing skills as possible and expand them upward towards a higher chronological age level.Working with kids on the autism spectrum, I found it to be more useful to think of therapy goals as advancing one functional skill as broadly as possible to develop as deep of an understanding and as broad of a functional, expressive use as I could. 

More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!
More shoebox play ideas from Looks Like Language!

These photos show one way to start with a basic set of vocabulary words, determine a symbol level to use, and bring the vocabulary into basic sentence structure.

Add some pragmatics, like requesting, commenting and 'no,' to build in functional communicative uses.

Bring in some literacy and play skills using the same words. You have given your student the visual equivalent of word association skills, building word knowledge and use, adding a slightly expanded skill to the base you started with.

This way, while you are building your student's communicative skills, you are also maintaining what was learned and expanding skills in a way that only adds one new piece at a time. Working in little chunks makes learning less intimidating and frustrating; more achievable and successful.

Would you want to go straight to the final in your most demanding class or learn each step a little at a time?


Many thanks to Barbara Bloomfield for getting me started. Rest in Peace.
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