2 Free Resources for Fun Holiday Help!

Do you get so busy preparing for the holidays that you just can't wait for vacation to arrive? I think our students may pick up on this, as well as feeling like they just can't wait to celebrate!

Click to download the free printable Holiday Matching Game.
Whatever the reason, sticking to the regular routines seems to get harder the closer the holiday gets. A little change in the 'work' level, while still teaching and reviewing skills, may be just what is needed this holiday season.

If you prefer to have printable materials that can be used in any location, you will want to download the updated version of my Open Ended Holiday Matching Game. Just click here to download the first set.

If you get my newsletter, you are in for a treat with double the amount of cards for additional ways to play! So be sure to open your email this week.

Have fun decorating for Christmas with this free interactive game for iPads.
For busy SLPs and parents, using the iPad may be the way to go! If so, you will want to check out the free Christmas Time interactive game for iPads and phones at my TpT store. Kids can play independently to decorate the house for Christmas or turn it into a more structured activity for teletherapy by reviewing work each turn.

Either way, I have you covered! Be sure to stop back weekly for more fun!

3 Tips for Making Sense of IEP Goals

A new student enters your caseload with an IEP and goals already set up for the year. Your first thought may be, “FANTASTIC! One less IEP to do!”  But as you dig in deeper, you begin to wonder what in the world is going on here.
The goals are all done, but they aren’t the kind you write.

Tips for Prioritizing Needs and Using Goals You Didn't Write
Maybe they are so long and in depth that you wonder how anyone could think a superhero SLP would get that done in a year.

Maybe they are so short and simplistic that you feel the student has nothing to gain from it.

Maybe you are just confused about why it was chosen at all.

One thing that I’ve learned over the years is that we should give each other the benefit of the doubt, since there are so many different factors that come into play, depending on where you work, what your experience level is, and what your therapy framework is. 


Most of the time, there is something in a goal that you can work with.

WHERE YOU WORK


Some school districts have IEPs scattered throughout the year. In the month before, you assess the students, whom you already know well after having them on your caseload for a while, and write new goals that continue from the current skill level. Lots of written work, but pretty straightforward.

Some school districts use IEP compendiums, purchased or self-made. The benefit to using computerized IEP goals is that it can cut back on the time you spend re-writing goals. 

Drawbacks can include:
• If the goals are detailed and specific, there may not be enough of them to cover all of your students’ varied needs.
• If the goals are broad, listing every skill needed to be able to do the functional skill in a year’s time, it can feel overwhelming. “I have to accomplish all of this! Are they out of their minds?”

Solutions can include:

• Finding out the way to add a goal that is not currently in the compendium so that your students’ specific need can be met.

• Figuring out which part of the lengthy set of skills shows where your students’ current needs are and addressing that specific section of the goal. Session notes document exactly what is being addressed and the data to document growth. Informal measures taken quarterly can look at the big picture to show that progress is being made toward the overall goal as well.


Some school districts put pressure on providers of special services to provide fewer services, write more goals, have higher levels of success, you name it. This can come about because of administrative pushes, funding issues, audit results, and probably a variety of other causes. This is the reality of therapy in schools. Do your best for your students within the parameters you’ve been given, decide to fight against it or move on to another job.


Use informal assessments and team input to help prioritize needs.

OUR EXPERIENCE LEVEL


With large caseloads, multiple schools, and varying degrees of practical experience, SLPS are doing the best they can. No one went into this field thinking it was a huge money-making career, so assume that we all have our students' interests at heart.

As beginning therapists, we all work on building up our resources: materials,  knowledge of strategies, the variety of student management techniques, ability to handle the overabundance of paperwork, and diversifying our therapy skill sets in general.

Maybe that goal that has you perplexed stems from a subtest score that the participants in the IEP meeting were especially concerned about.

Maybe the new therapist chose similar areas of student need for much of their caseload because they felt secure about helping students make improvements in groups while they learned to handle more diversity.

Maybe that one goal has enough flexibility built in that the therapist was better able to meet diverse group needs!

THERAPY FRAMEWORK


Face it, speech/language therapy covers a multitude of disabilities and skills!  We all have some aspect of communication that we are especially interested in, and that helps to personalize the lens that we use to assess students.

Especially for students with bigger delays and multiple needs! One of the hardest parts of our job is prioritizing what to work on when a student has delays in many skills so that you can have the biggest positive impact in their lives.

TIPS FOR PRIORITIZING NEEDS


Listen!
Listen to everyone on the student’s team to hear what they are all saying about the student’s weaknesses. Parents, who know their child best of all. Teachers, who observe the student in many school contexts, have knowledge of both strengths and weakness, and other students to compare against. Specialists, who bring their specific area knowledge to combine with yours and help the child as a whole.

Observe!
Informal assessment can occur at any time or any place during the school day. Build a relationship with your student’s teachers and find out what their concerns are. Watch the students in the room in between sessions when you are picking up and dropping off. Pay attention to their interactions with peers while you are on your way to the copying machine, or doing bus and lunchroom duties.

Think!
Think about what you know about the child’s language system and how this could be impacting the ability to function in the school. What strengths and weaknesses are a common theme in the team discussion? What communication needs can a part of any behavioral concerns? Is there a pattern showing that improvement in a specific area of communication deficits could help the student at multiple times of the school day? There’s your answer!

BRINGING IN RELATED SKILLS


At some point in the year, you will have reached a point where you feel comfortable with your therapy routines and materials for the specific aspects of students’ goals that you are taking data on since you are seeing progress.

Yes, you will! And every year it gets a bit easier.  But, for me at least, the discomfort level at the beginning of the school year never stopped. Kudos to you if you have managed it! 


When you reach a point that you can look beyond the next week or month, or your student shows that the basic aspects of the IEP goal have been learned, think about bringing in some of those skills that were not a priority at the beginning of the year. Keep on listening, because the student may have another priority need by now.

Or maybe there are some other areas of need that just tie in well with the types of activities the student is experiencing progress with. Some ideas are:

* The student who answers basic WH questions can play teacher and ask you or peers the questions.
* The student with improved memory strategies can apply the skills socially to remember information about peers for better social skills.
* The student who follows directions now can try giving the directions in an activity.
* The student who understands narrative structure in simple stories can use it to expand personal narratives or make them more concise.
* The student who uses expanded sentences in structure can work on social skills and reinforce the expanded sentences in a social activity.

Don’t be too fast to move on to new skills when you can incorporate newly learned skills with other areas of weakness. Combine your therapy expertise and framework with the IEP goals the student came with to meet as many of the student’s communication needs as you can. Your students will benefit!

Enjoy!

Building Thanksgiving Sentences Freebie

Are you looking for a functional and easy activity to finish up your Thanksgiving theme this week? Here it is!

Picture sentence activity for Thanksgiving free from Looks Like Language!
Students will have fun before and after Thanksgiving, making sentences to tell about the holiday and prompting discussions of what their families did this year. Little ones often need pictures to prompt recall of past activities, so this game helps with answering questions and telling short narratives, too.

This week's download has noun-verb-noun prompts, without the color coding, for higher level students, but the same cute pictures.

And it is free! So be sure to download it now. Just click here.

If you missed last week's color-coded version, click here.

And have a lovely Thanksgiving! Enjoy!

Building Sentences about Thanksgiving Freebie

The only thing better than talking about food is eating it! Help your students build sentences to communicate about food activities this Thanksgiving with this easy to use free download.

Since I love to help you out with mixed groups, this free download has two versions so that students at different levels can do the same activity.


Build Thanksgiving Sentences in mixed groups with this free download.
This week's download is the lower level part of the set. The parts of speech for the sentences have color coded borders that coordinate with Proloquo and many other AAC systems. There is color coding on the game cards, as well, to make sequencing the words in the sentences easier.

Not only that, but you can choose whether students need to complete 1, 2, or 3 sentences during the activity, according to their ability levels. 

We all like to talk about foods! It is great also for providing visual supports for after the holiday to help students communicate about what they did at home.

Get your free download here, and be sure to come back next week for the other set!

Enjoy!

Last Minute Halloween Printable for SLPs

Do you ever have nightmares where you are at school and realize that you never finished planning for the week? And your students are getting noisier and starting to move around the room loudly while you are trying to remember what you meant to do? 

And then there's a knock on the door and the principal shows up for a surprise observation?


Monster Describing Free Activity Download!
Phew! Thank goodness it was just a bad dream!
But, seriously, working in a school takes a lot of planning. 

If you are doing some last minute planning for Halloween, I invite you to click here to check out my Pinterest board for some great ideas that will make your life easier! Crafts, books, food ideas, freebies- lots of fun stuff there!

More Halloween fun can be found by visiting my store here.

How about a quick and easy freebie for last minute planning? I have you covered! Just click here. And be sure to sign up for my newsletter!

Enjoy!

A Sweet Halloween Treat for You! Part 3

So, let's be honest with each other, now. How many of the sweet treats you bought for the trick or treaters have gotten past your lips? I can't buy chocolate candies at Halloween for just that reason. Thank goodness I can resist some candy!

Well, this treat has no calories because it consists of free, printable Halloween worksheets for basic skills. This week completes the set unless you have subscribed to my newsletter. My followers got an extra goodie!

You can sign up, too! Just fill in your information on the dreaded pop-up!

Enjoy Halloween!


A Sweet Halloween Treat for You! Part 2

You know the thing about sweets? If you have one treat, you just want another? Well, it's a good thing that I have another Halloween treat for you!
Conplete your free set with the newest download at Looks Like Language!

This packet has basic skills Halloween worksheets that you can download weekly to get a free set. 

When you have one of those days when you are always behind, just have one of these handy to send home as a quick themed review!

Download it here.

You don't work with little ones? Click here to check out the detailed preview for Halloween Costume Picture Activities for Mixed Level Groups. 

See if it is right for you!

Enjoy!
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